Avi J Cohen

Department of Economics

Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1072
Phone: (416)736-2100 Ext: 77046
Emailavicohen@yorku.ca
Primary websiteavicohen.info.yorku.ca

I am a Professor in the Department of Economics at York University, a Life Fellow of Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge, and hold a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. I have been President of the History of Economics Society, a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University, and have research interests in the history of economics and student learning. I have written extensively about capital theory and capital controversies in the history of economics, and the methodological implications for economic theory in general. My research on teaching extends to improving student learning through integrating writing into the curriculum, creating interactive environments in large lectures and exploring uses of new technologies to enhance learner-centred education. I have been fortunate to receive numerous teaching awards, including Canada's most prestigious national award for educational leadership, the 3M Teaching Fellowship.

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Area of Specialization

Economics

Degrees

PhD Economics, Stanford University
MA Economics, Stanford University
BA Economics, University of Michigan

Professional Leadership

Senior Research Fellow, Center for the History of Political Economy, Duke University, Spring 2011.
Invited Faculty, STOREP (Italian Association for the History of Economics) European Summer School, Bressanone/Brixen, Italy, August 2008.
President, History of Economics Society (term 2008 – 2009). Organizer of annual HES Conference, York University, 27-30 June 2008.
Vice-President, History of Economics Society, 2004 – 2005.
Chair, Committee on Undergraduate Education, History of Economics Society, 2002 – 2004.

Research Interests

Economics , HIstory of Economics, Capital Theory, Economics Education

All Publications

Books

(Macro) Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All? (with Study Guide by I. Howe), 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2010).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All? , 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2010).

(Micro) Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You (with Study Guide by I. Howe), 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You , 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009).

Study Guide, 7th edition (with H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 7 th edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009) [2006, 2003, 2000, 1997, 1994, 1991].

Capital Theory, Vols I-III, (co-edited with C. Bliss and G.C. Harcourt), in the series Critical Ideas in Economics (edited by K.D. Hoover and M. Blaug) (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

Economics Study Guide: European Edition (with D. Fry, H. King and M. Powell) to accompany Parkin, Powell and Matthews, Economics European Edition, 6th edition (Harlow, England: Addison-Wesley, 2005).

Guide de l’étudiant (with Pierre Chapleau and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Microéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [1999, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Microeconomics].

Guide de l’étudiant (with D. Sanga and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Macroéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [2000, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Macroeconomics].

Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy, (co-edited with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin) (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 3rd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 3rd edition (Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley, 1997).

Macroeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Macroeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997) [1996].

Microeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Microeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997) [1995].

Book Chapters

“Reswitching and Reversing in Capital Theory” (with G.C. Harcourt), in M. Blaug and P. Lloyd (eds.) Famous Figures and Diagrams in Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2010), pp. 191-8.

“Cambridge Controversies in Growth Theory,” in D. A. Clarke (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Development Studies (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2006), pp. 27-32.

“Introduction on Capital Theory Controversy: Scarcity, Production, Equilibrium and Time” (with G.C. Harcourt), in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005), Vol. I, pp. xxvii-lx.

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 1, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in M. Rutherford (ed.) The Economic Mind in America: Essays in the History of American Economics (Perspectives on the History of Economic Thought) (London: Routledge, 1998).

“Introduction” (with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin), in A. Cohen, H. Hagemann and J. Smithin (eds.) Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

“Böhm-Bawerk’s Letters to J.B. Clark: A Pre-Cambridge Controversy in the Theory of Capital” (with H. Drost), in P. Arestis, G. Palma and M. Sawyer (eds.) Capital Controversy, Post Keynesian Economics and the History of Economic Theory: Essays in Honour of Geoff Harcourt Vol, 1 (London: Routledge, 1996).

“Why Haven’t Textbooks Resolved Sraffa’s 1926 Complaints?: The Realism of U-Shaped Cost Curves and Dominance of Perfect Competition,” in N. Aslanbeigui and M. Naples (eds.) Rethinking Economic Principles: Critical Essays on Introductory Textbooks (Homewood, Ill.: Irwin, 1995).

"Samuelson and the 93% Scarcity Theory of Value," in M. Baranzini and G. Harcourt (eds.), The Dynamics of the Wealth of Nations: Growth, Distribution and Structural Change, Essays in Honour of Luigi Pasinetti (London: Macmillan, 1993).

“Does Joan Robinson's Critique of Equilibrium Entail Theoretical Nihilism?" in G. Mongiovi and C. Ruhl (eds.), Macroeconomic Theory: Diversity and Convergence (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993).

"Introduction to the Symposium" and editorship of Review Symposium on Philip Mirowski's "More Heat than Light: Economics as Social Physics, Physics as Nature's Economics," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 77-82.

Journal Articles

“Capital Controversy from Böhm-Bawerk to Bliss: Badly Posed or Very Deep Questions? or What ‘We’ Can Learn from Capital Controversy Even If You Don’t Care Who Won,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2010, 32(1), 1-21 (lead article).

"The Mythology of Capital or of Static Equilibrium?: The Böhm-Bawerk/Clark Controversy,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008, 30(2), 151-71 (lead article).

“The Kaldor/Knight Controversy: Is Capital A Distinct and Quantifiable Factor of Production?” European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2006, 13(1), 141-161.

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251. Reprinted in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 3, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

“Cambridge Capital Controversies – Comments and Response” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Fall 2003, 17(4), 227-233.

“The Hayek/Knight Capital Controversy: The Irrelevance of Roundaboutness, or Purging Processes in Time?” History of Political Economy, Fall 2003, 35(3), 469-490.

“Whatever Happened to the Cambridge Capital Controversies?” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 2003, 17(1), 199-214.

"What Was Abandoned Following the Cambridge Capital Controversies?: Samuelson, Substance, Scarcity and Value," History of Political Economy, Annual Supplement 1993, 25(5), 202-219.

“Using Writing Across the Curriculum in Economics: Is Taking the Plunge Worth It?” (with J. Spencer), Journal of Economic Education, Summer 1993, 24(3), 219-230.

“Seeing the Light Despite the Heat: Post-Mirowski History of Economic Thought," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 83-96.

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251.

"Factor Substitution and Induced Innovation in North American Kraft Pulping: 1914-1940,” Explorations in Economic History, April 1987, 24(2), 197-217.

"Issues in the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1985, 7(4), 612-615.

“The Methodological Resolution of the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1984, 6(4), 614-629.

“Technological Change as Historical Process: The Case of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry, 1915 - 1940," Journal of Economic History, September 1984, 44(3), 775-799.

"The Laws of Returns Under Competitive Conditions: Progress in Microeconomics Since Sraffa (1926)?" Eastern Economic Journal, July-September 1983, 9(3), 213-220.

Book Reviews

Response to review of Capital Theory, by F. Petri, European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008 15(2), 388-91.

J. Birner, The Cambridge Controversies in Capital Theory: A Study in the Logic of Theory Development, History of Political Economy, Winter 2005, 37(4), 755-6.

H.D. Kurz (ed.), Critical Essays on Piero Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics, History of Political Economy, Spring 2003, 35(1), 164-166.

N. Rosenberg, Schumpeter and the Endogeneity of Technology: Some American Perspectives, EH.NET, August 2003, http://eh.net/bookreviews/library/0661.shtml.

J. Henry, The Making of Neoclassical Economics, History of Political Economy, Fall 1994, 26(3), 510-513.

G. Hodgson and E. Screpanti (eds.), Rethinking Economics: Markets, Technology and Economic Evolution, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1993, 31(3), 1448-1449.

E. R. Weintraub, Stabilizing Dynamics: Constructing Economic Knowledge, Journal of Economic History, December 1992, 52(4), 977-978.

N. De Marchi (ed.), “The Popperian Legacy in Economics: Papers Presented at a Symposium in Amsterdam”, December 1985, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, December 1990, 19(4), 527-531.

P. Deane, The State and the Economic System: An Introduction to the History of Political Economy, Journal of Economic History, March 1990, 50(1), 240-241.

G.C. Harcourt, Controversies in Political Economy, Eastern Economic Journal, January - March 1988, 14(1), 114-115.

J.A. McGaw, Most Wonderful Machine: Mechanization and Social Change in Berkshire Paper Making, 1801 - 1885, Journal of Economic History, December 1987, 47(4),1044-1046.

C.E. Twining, Phil Weyerhaeuser: Lumberman, Journal of Economic History, Dec. 1986, 46(4), 1098-9.

J. Pen, Among Economists: Reflections of a Neo-classical Post Keynesian, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1986, 24(3), 1218-1219.

D.L. Boese, Papermakers: The Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Journal of Forest History, January 1986, 30(1), 44-45.

J.J. Klant, The Rules of the Game: The Logical Structure of Economic Theories, Journal of Economic Literature, December 1985, 23(4), 1788-1789.

J. Elster, Explaining Technical Change, Journal of Economic Issues, March 1985, 19(1), 263-265.

Other

Veblen Contra Clark and Fisher: Veblen-Robinson-Harcourt Lineages in Capital Controversies and Beyond
Cambridge Journal of Economics , 38(6), November 2014, pp. 1493-1515
Abstract: In the midst of Joan Robinson's critique of neoclassical capital theory, she remarked 'that Thorstein Veblen had made my point, much better than I did, in 1908'. Robinson was referring to Veblen's attacks on the capital theories of J. B. Clark and Irving Fisher. With little written on these earlier capital controversies, one purpose of this article is to fill in the historical record by providing a capital specific examination of Veblen's attacks and Clark's and Fisher's responses. The second purpose is to explore the unique connections between the Veblen/Clark/Fisher and the Cambridge capital controversies by focussing on three authors: Veblen, Robinson and Harcourt. These controversies shared clashes of fundamentally different visions of economic life, as well as differences regarding the historical contextualisation of the meaning of capital and the role of social institutions. The adequacy of equilibrium analysis and ideology also play more complex roles compared to other capital controversies conducted within a largely shared vision.
[go to paper]

How and Why to Teach the History of Economic Thought: Economics as Historically Produced Knowledge
(with R. Emmett)
in K. McGoldrick and G. Hoyt (eds.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics , (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011), pp. 543-555
Abstract: N/A
[go to paper]

Classical and Neoclassical Theories of General Equilibrium
(with J. Cohen)
Australian Economic Papers , 22(40), June 1983, pp. 180-200
Abstract: N/A.
[go to paper]

Current Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Summer 2017 AP/ECON1900 3.0  Microeconomics for Business & Life  ONLN  
Summer 2017 AP/ECON1910 3.0  Macroeconomics for Business and Life ONLN  


I am a Professor in the Department of Economics at York University, a Life Fellow of Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge, and hold a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. I have been President of the History of Economics Society, a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University, and have research interests in the history of economics and student learning. I have written extensively about capital theory and capital controversies in the history of economics, and the methodological implications for economic theory in general. My research on teaching extends to improving student learning through integrating writing into the curriculum, creating interactive environments in large lectures and exploring uses of new technologies to enhance learner-centred education. I have been fortunate to receive numerous teaching awards, including Canada's most prestigious national award for educational leadership, the 3M Teaching Fellowship.

Area of Specialization

Economics

Degrees

PhD Economics, Stanford University
MA Economics, Stanford University
BA Economics, University of Michigan

Professional Leadership

Senior Research Fellow, Center for the History of Political Economy, Duke University, Spring 2011.
Invited Faculty, STOREP (Italian Association for the History of Economics) European Summer School, Bressanone/Brixen, Italy, August 2008.
President, History of Economics Society (term 2008 – 2009). Organizer of annual HES Conference, York University, 27-30 June 2008.
Vice-President, History of Economics Society, 2004 – 2005.
Chair, Committee on Undergraduate Education, History of Economics Society, 2002 – 2004.

Research Interests:

Economics , HIstory of Economics, Capital Theory, Economics Education

All Publications

Books

(Macro) Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All? (with Study Guide by I. Howe), 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2010).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All? , 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2010).

(Micro) Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You (with Study Guide by I. Howe), 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You , 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009).

Study Guide, 7th edition (with H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 7 th edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2009) [2006, 2003, 2000, 1997, 1994, 1991].

Capital Theory, Vols I-III, (co-edited with C. Bliss and G.C. Harcourt), in the series Critical Ideas in Economics (edited by K.D. Hoover and M. Blaug) (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

Economics Study Guide: European Edition (with D. Fry, H. King and M. Powell) to accompany Parkin, Powell and Matthews, Economics European Edition, 6th edition (Harlow, England: Addison-Wesley, 2005).

Guide de l’étudiant (with Pierre Chapleau and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Microéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [1999, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Microeconomics].

Guide de l’étudiant (with D. Sanga and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Macroéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [2000, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Macroeconomics].

Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy, (co-edited with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin) (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 3rd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 3rd edition (Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley, 1997).

Macroeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Macroeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997) [1996].

Microeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Microeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997) [1995].

Book Chapters

“Reswitching and Reversing in Capital Theory” (with G.C. Harcourt), in M. Blaug and P. Lloyd (eds.) Famous Figures and Diagrams in Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2010), pp. 191-8.

“Cambridge Controversies in Growth Theory,” in D. A. Clarke (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Development Studies (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2006), pp. 27-32.

“Introduction on Capital Theory Controversy: Scarcity, Production, Equilibrium and Time” (with G.C. Harcourt), in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005), Vol. I, pp. xxvii-lx.

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 1, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in M. Rutherford (ed.) The Economic Mind in America: Essays in the History of American Economics (Perspectives on the History of Economic Thought) (London: Routledge, 1998).

“Introduction” (with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin), in A. Cohen, H. Hagemann and J. Smithin (eds.) Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

“Böhm-Bawerk’s Letters to J.B. Clark: A Pre-Cambridge Controversy in the Theory of Capital” (with H. Drost), in P. Arestis, G. Palma and M. Sawyer (eds.) Capital Controversy, Post Keynesian Economics and the History of Economic Theory: Essays in Honour of Geoff Harcourt Vol, 1 (London: Routledge, 1996).

“Why Haven’t Textbooks Resolved Sraffa’s 1926 Complaints?: The Realism of U-Shaped Cost Curves and Dominance of Perfect Competition,” in N. Aslanbeigui and M. Naples (eds.) Rethinking Economic Principles: Critical Essays on Introductory Textbooks (Homewood, Ill.: Irwin, 1995).

"Samuelson and the 93% Scarcity Theory of Value," in M. Baranzini and G. Harcourt (eds.), The Dynamics of the Wealth of Nations: Growth, Distribution and Structural Change, Essays in Honour of Luigi Pasinetti (London: Macmillan, 1993).

“Does Joan Robinson's Critique of Equilibrium Entail Theoretical Nihilism?" in G. Mongiovi and C. Ruhl (eds.), Macroeconomic Theory: Diversity and Convergence (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993).

"Introduction to the Symposium" and editorship of Review Symposium on Philip Mirowski's "More Heat than Light: Economics as Social Physics, Physics as Nature's Economics," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 77-82.

Journal Articles

“Capital Controversy from Böhm-Bawerk to Bliss: Badly Posed or Very Deep Questions? or What ‘We’ Can Learn from Capital Controversy Even If You Don’t Care Who Won,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2010, 32(1), 1-21 (lead article).

"The Mythology of Capital or of Static Equilibrium?: The Böhm-Bawerk/Clark Controversy,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008, 30(2), 151-71 (lead article).

“The Kaldor/Knight Controversy: Is Capital A Distinct and Quantifiable Factor of Production?” European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2006, 13(1), 141-161.

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251. Reprinted in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 3, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

“Cambridge Capital Controversies – Comments and Response” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Fall 2003, 17(4), 227-233.

“The Hayek/Knight Capital Controversy: The Irrelevance of Roundaboutness, or Purging Processes in Time?” History of Political Economy, Fall 2003, 35(3), 469-490.

“Whatever Happened to the Cambridge Capital Controversies?” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 2003, 17(1), 199-214.

"What Was Abandoned Following the Cambridge Capital Controversies?: Samuelson, Substance, Scarcity and Value," History of Political Economy, Annual Supplement 1993, 25(5), 202-219.

“Using Writing Across the Curriculum in Economics: Is Taking the Plunge Worth It?” (with J. Spencer), Journal of Economic Education, Summer 1993, 24(3), 219-230.

“Seeing the Light Despite the Heat: Post-Mirowski History of Economic Thought," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 83-96.

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251.

"Factor Substitution and Induced Innovation in North American Kraft Pulping: 1914-1940,” Explorations in Economic History, April 1987, 24(2), 197-217.

"Issues in the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1985, 7(4), 612-615.

“The Methodological Resolution of the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1984, 6(4), 614-629.

“Technological Change as Historical Process: The Case of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry, 1915 - 1940," Journal of Economic History, September 1984, 44(3), 775-799.

"The Laws of Returns Under Competitive Conditions: Progress in Microeconomics Since Sraffa (1926)?" Eastern Economic Journal, July-September 1983, 9(3), 213-220.

Book Reviews

Response to review of Capital Theory, by F. Petri, European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008 15(2), 388-91.

J. Birner, The Cambridge Controversies in Capital Theory: A Study in the Logic of Theory Development, History of Political Economy, Winter 2005, 37(4), 755-6.

H.D. Kurz (ed.), Critical Essays on Piero Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics, History of Political Economy, Spring 2003, 35(1), 164-166.

N. Rosenberg, Schumpeter and the Endogeneity of Technology: Some American Perspectives, EH.NET, August 2003, http://eh.net/bookreviews/library/0661.shtml.

J. Henry, The Making of Neoclassical Economics, History of Political Economy, Fall 1994, 26(3), 510-513.

G. Hodgson and E. Screpanti (eds.), Rethinking Economics: Markets, Technology and Economic Evolution, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1993, 31(3), 1448-1449.

E. R. Weintraub, Stabilizing Dynamics: Constructing Economic Knowledge, Journal of Economic History, December 1992, 52(4), 977-978.

N. De Marchi (ed.), “The Popperian Legacy in Economics: Papers Presented at a Symposium in Amsterdam”, December 1985, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, December 1990, 19(4), 527-531.

P. Deane, The State and the Economic System: An Introduction to the History of Political Economy, Journal of Economic History, March 1990, 50(1), 240-241.

G.C. Harcourt, Controversies in Political Economy, Eastern Economic Journal, January - March 1988, 14(1), 114-115.

J.A. McGaw, Most Wonderful Machine: Mechanization and Social Change in Berkshire Paper Making, 1801 - 1885, Journal of Economic History, December 1987, 47(4),1044-1046.

C.E. Twining, Phil Weyerhaeuser: Lumberman, Journal of Economic History, Dec. 1986, 46(4), 1098-9.

J. Pen, Among Economists: Reflections of a Neo-classical Post Keynesian, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1986, 24(3), 1218-1219.

D.L. Boese, Papermakers: The Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Journal of Forest History, January 1986, 30(1), 44-45.

J.J. Klant, The Rules of the Game: The Logical Structure of Economic Theories, Journal of Economic Literature, December 1985, 23(4), 1788-1789.

J. Elster, Explaining Technical Change, Journal of Economic Issues, March 1985, 19(1), 263-265.

Other

Veblen Contra Clark and Fisher: Veblen-Robinson-Harcourt Lineages in Capital Controversies and Beyond
Cambridge Journal of Economics , 38(6), November 2014, pp. 1493-1515
Abstract: In the midst of Joan Robinson's critique of neoclassical capital theory, she remarked 'that Thorstein Veblen had made my point, much better than I did, in 1908'. Robinson was referring to Veblen's attacks on the capital theories of J. B. Clark and Irving Fisher. With little written on these earlier capital controversies, one purpose of this article is to fill in the historical record by providing a capital specific examination of Veblen's attacks and Clark's and Fisher's responses. The second purpose is to explore the unique connections between the Veblen/Clark/Fisher and the Cambridge capital controversies by focussing on three authors: Veblen, Robinson and Harcourt. These controversies shared clashes of fundamentally different visions of economic life, as well as differences regarding the historical contextualisation of the meaning of capital and the role of social institutions. The adequacy of equilibrium analysis and ideology also play more complex roles compared to other capital controversies conducted within a largely shared vision.
[go to paper]

How and Why to Teach the History of Economic Thought: Economics as Historically Produced Knowledge
(with R. Emmett)
in K. McGoldrick and G. Hoyt (eds.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics , (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011), pp. 543-555
Abstract: N/A
[go to paper]

Classical and Neoclassical Theories of General Equilibrium
(with J. Cohen)
Australian Economic Papers , 22(40), June 1983, pp. 180-200
Abstract: N/A.
[go to paper]


Teaching:

Current Courses

<
TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Summer 2017 AP/ECON1900 3.0  Microeconomics for Business & Life  ONLN  
Summer 2017 AP/ECON1910 3.0  Macroeconomics for Business and Life ONLN