Suzanne L Cook

Department of Sociology

Assistant Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 2155
Phone: (416)736-2100 Ext: 60308
Emailcooks@yorku.ca

Dr. Suzanne L. Cook is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Health. Her research examines new directions for older adults and she coined the term ‘Redirection’ for this stage of life. As a social gerontologist, her work is at the interface of sociology, psychology and adult development where she investigates social roles and purpose, self-esteem, well-being and paid and unpaid work. Dr. Cook is currently investigating diverse pathways for Redirection and older adults' experiences as they find later life purpose and challenge. She is also working on projects related to intergenerational education. By examining the experiences of older adults, her work has great implications for social policy as well as the potential to shape a new vision of aging. Her research interests include lifelong learning, community engagement, intergenerational connections, older workers and career development as well as ageism, age discrimination, social inequality and public policy. Dr. Cook's research is funded by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC). Dr. Cook is a member of the York University Centre of Aging Research and Education and Faculty Fellow with the Trent Centre for Aging and Society at Trent University.

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Degrees

PhD, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
MSc, Purdue University
BASc, University of Guelph

Appointments

Faculty of Health


Research Interests

Aging , Education , Social roles, community engagement and purpose, Work, career development and the mature workforce, Transition, identity and self-esteem

All Publications

Journal Articles

Brenda M. Elias & Suzanne L. Cook (2016). Exploring the Connection Between Personal Space and Social Participation, Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 30 (1), pp. 107-122. DOI:10.1080/02763893.2015.1129385

Cook, S. L. (2015) . Redirection: An extension of career during retirement. The Gerontologist. 55(3), 360-373. DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnt105 (available on-line Sept. 2013)

Anderson, N. D., Damianakis, T., Kröger, E., Wagner, L. M., Dawson, D. R., M. A. Binns, M. A., Bernstein, S., Caspi, E., Cook, S. L. & the BRAVO Team (2014). The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: A critical review and recommendations for future research. Psychological Bulletin, 140(6), 1505-1533. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037610

Cook, S. L. (March, 2011) . An exploration of learning through volunteering during retirement, International Journal of Volunteer Administration, 28, 9-19.

Cook, S. L. & Sumner, J. (2009) . New spaces and new places: Adult education and the creation of alternative foodscapes. Food Security Conversations: Charting the Way Forward. Graduate Food Discussion Paper Series, 1(1) 19 - 24. Ryerson University, Toronto. Available online: http://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/ foodsecurity/GradudateFoodDiscussionsVol1-1.pdf

Professional Journal Articles

Cook, S. L. & Gelfusa, M. (2009) . Boomer volunteer engagement: Targeted strategies, Canadian Journal of Volunteer Resources Management, 28, 11-13.

Book Reviews

Cook, S. L. (2013) . Unearthing Canada’s hidden past: A short history of adult education, Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 25(2), 94-96.

Policy Papers

Klassen, T. R. & Cook, S. L. (2016) . Identifying and Understanding Innovations in Labour Market Adjustment Programs for Older Workers. Report prepared for the Ontario Human Capital Research Innovation Fund. March 2016. 35 p.

Cook, S. L. & Speevak Sladowski, P. (2013) . Volunteering and Older Adults. Ottawa, Canada: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. 55 p. http://volunteer.ca/content/volunteering-and-older-adults-final-report

Other

Cook, S. L. (2009) . Learning civic environmentalism by doing: Reflections from activists’ experiences in Ontario. In K. Daly, D. Schugurensky, & K. Lopes (Eds.), Learning Democracy by Doing: Alternative Practices in Citizenship Learning and Participatory Democracy. (pp. 425-436).Transformative Learning Centre, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. (on-line book) http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/UserFiles/File/LDD%20Proceedings%20Master%20Document%20-%2026%20Oct%2009.pdf


Dr. Suzanne L. Cook is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Health. Her research examines new directions for older adults and she coined the term ‘Redirection’ for this stage of life. As a social gerontologist, her work is at the interface of sociology, psychology and adult development where she investigates social roles and purpose, self-esteem, well-being and paid and unpaid work. Dr. Cook is currently investigating diverse pathways for Redirection and older adults' experiences as they find later life purpose and challenge. She is also working on projects related to intergenerational education. By examining the experiences of older adults, her work has great implications for social policy as well as the potential to shape a new vision of aging. Her research interests include lifelong learning, community engagement, intergenerational connections, older workers and career development as well as ageism, age discrimination, social inequality and public policy. Dr. Cook's research is funded by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC). Dr. Cook is a member of the York University Centre of Aging Research and Education and Faculty Fellow with the Trent Centre for Aging and Society at Trent University.

Degrees

PhD, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
MSc, Purdue University
BASc, University of Guelph

Appointments

Faculty of Health

Research Interests:

Aging , Education , Social roles, community engagement and purpose, Work, career development and the mature workforce, Transition, identity and self-esteem

All Publications

Journal Articles

Brenda M. Elias & Suzanne L. Cook (2016). Exploring the Connection Between Personal Space and Social Participation, Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 30 (1), pp. 107-122. DOI:10.1080/02763893.2015.1129385

Cook, S. L. (2015) . Redirection: An extension of career during retirement. The Gerontologist. 55(3), 360-373. DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnt105 (available on-line Sept. 2013)

Anderson, N. D., Damianakis, T., Kröger, E., Wagner, L. M., Dawson, D. R., M. A. Binns, M. A., Bernstein, S., Caspi, E., Cook, S. L. & the BRAVO Team (2014). The benefits associated with volunteering among seniors: A critical review and recommendations for future research. Psychological Bulletin, 140(6), 1505-1533. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037610

Cook, S. L. (March, 2011) . An exploration of learning through volunteering during retirement, International Journal of Volunteer Administration, 28, 9-19.

Cook, S. L. & Sumner, J. (2009) . New spaces and new places: Adult education and the creation of alternative foodscapes. Food Security Conversations: Charting the Way Forward. Graduate Food Discussion Paper Series, 1(1) 19 - 24. Ryerson University, Toronto. Available online: http://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/ foodsecurity/GradudateFoodDiscussionsVol1-1.pdf

Professional Journal Articles

Cook, S. L. & Gelfusa, M. (2009) . Boomer volunteer engagement: Targeted strategies, Canadian Journal of Volunteer Resources Management, 28, 11-13.

Book Reviews

Cook, S. L. (2013) . Unearthing Canada’s hidden past: A short history of adult education, Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 25(2), 94-96.

Policy Papers

Klassen, T. R. & Cook, S. L. (2016) . Identifying and Understanding Innovations in Labour Market Adjustment Programs for Older Workers. Report prepared for the Ontario Human Capital Research Innovation Fund. March 2016. 35 p.

Cook, S. L. & Speevak Sladowski, P. (2013) . Volunteering and Older Adults. Ottawa, Canada: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. 55 p. http://volunteer.ca/content/volunteering-and-older-adults-final-report

Other

Cook, S. L. (2009) . Learning civic environmentalism by doing: Reflections from activists’ experiences in Ontario. In K. Daly, D. Schugurensky, & K. Lopes (Eds.), Learning Democracy by Doing: Alternative Practices in Citizenship Learning and Participatory Democracy. (pp. 425-436).Transformative Learning Centre, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. (on-line book) http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/UserFiles/File/LDD%20Proceedings%20Master%20Document%20-%2026%20Oct%2009.pdf