David Goldstein

Department of English

Associate Professor

Office: Stong College, 301E
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 30355
Emaildgolds@yorku.ca

David Goldstein’s teaching and research interests include sixteenth- and seventeenth-century British literature, food studies, poetry writing and translation, contemporary poetry and poetics, literary and cultural theory, and book history. He is the author of a book of literary criticism, Eating and Ethics in Shakespeare's England, which won the 2014 Shakespeare's Globe Book Award; two co-edited collections of Shakespeare criticism; and a volume of poems, Laws of Rest, with another forthcoming. He has published articles on the Scottish context of The Merchant of Venice, food in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, Titus Andronicus and American cannibalism, Martha Stewart and domestic labour, and Robert Duncan as a translator of Rilke. His poetry and translations have appeared in journals and anthologies across North America. A former restaurant critic and journalist, his food writing has appeared in SAVEUR, The New York Sun, and numerous other publications. In the 2011-12 year, he coordinated the Creative Writing Program. Before joining the faculty at York, he was an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa.

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Area of Specialization

English

Degrees

Ph.D. in English, Stanford University
M.A. in Writing, The Johns Hopkins University
B.A. in English, Yale University

Current Research Projects

With Whom We Eat: Literature and Commensality

Summary: 
In his essay “On Experience,” the sixteenth-century philosopher Michel de Montaigne asserts, “We should not so much consider what we eat as with whom we eat.” My next monograph, With Whom We Eat: Literature and Commensality, explores the concept of commensality—the relationships produced by acts of eating, the “with whom” of food—in imaginative literature from the ancient, early modern, and contemporary periods. The project seeks to define commensality as fundamental to a cultural understanding of food, to explore the centrality of the concept in literary texts, and to demonstrate the importance of literary criticism to the burgeoning discipline of food studies—a discipline in which the study of imaginative writing is often marginalized. The project views literary history from the perspective of food in order to divine what we can learn from them in the context of our own relationships to eating.


Project Type: Funded

Lost Originals

Summary: 
A book of poems, to be published in fall 2016 by BookThug.

All Publications

Books

Culinary Shakespeare (edited collection). Amy Tigner, co-editor. Duquesne University Press, 2016.

Shakespeare and Hospitality (edited collection). Julia Reinhard Lupton, co-editor. Routledge, 2016.

Lost Originals. Toronto: BookThug, 2016.

Object Permanence (poetry chapbook). Ugly Duckling Presse: 2015.

Laws of Rest (poetry book). BookThug: 2013.

Eating and Ethics in Shakespeare's England (scholarly monograph). Cambridge University Press: 2013.

Been Raw Diction (poetry chapbook). Dusie Press, 2006.

Book Chapters

“Facing King Lear.” In Shakespeare and the Power of the Face. Ed. James Knapp. Burlington, VT: Ashgate Press, 2015, pp 75-91.

“Woolley’s Mouse: Early Modern Recipe Books and the Uses of Nature.” In Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity. Ed. Jennifer Munroe and Rebecca Laroche. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 105-128.

“Recipes for Living: Martha Stewart and the New American Subject.” Ordinary Lifestyles: Popular Media, Consumption and Taste Cultures. Ed. David Bell and Joanne Hollows. London: Open University Press, 2005.

Journal Articles

“The Price of Pork: Jews, Scots, and Pigs in The Merchant of Venice.” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 54.2, Spring 2014, pp. 315-348.

“Emmanuel Levinas and the Ontology of Eating.” Gastronomica, Summer 2010, pp. 34-44.

“The Cook and the Cannibal: Titus Andronicus and the New World.” Shakespeare Studies 37, Fall 2009, pp. 99-133.

“Shakespeare and Food: A Review Essay.” Literature Compass 6:1, January 2009, pp. 153-174.

“The Lure of the God: Robert Duncan on Translating Rilke.” John Felstiner, co-author. Jacket magazine 31: October 2006.

Approach To Teaching

Methods of learning have changed greatly since the Elizabethan schoolmaster John Ascham wrote that “the scholehouse should be counted a sanctuary against feare,” but the essence of his statement remains fresh. In every class I teach, my goal is to spark the enthusiasm of my students both for the subject at hand and for the learning process. I view my classroom as a space for experimentation without fear of recrimination. I encourage students to explore unfamiliar ideas to the greatest possible extent, while developing a clear understanding of the space’s boundaries. By creating a supportive, exciting environment for the pursuit of knowledge, I hope to imbue in my students a general love of learning and to help instill in them the curiosity and inspiration to continue the journey.

Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/EN3620 6.0  Intermediate Poetry Workshop SEMR  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/EN4002 6.0  Food and Writing SEMR  


David Goldstein’s teaching and research interests include sixteenth- and seventeenth-century British literature, food studies, poetry writing and translation, contemporary poetry and poetics, literary and cultural theory, and book history. He is the author of a book of literary criticism, Eating and Ethics in Shakespeare's England, which won the 2014 Shakespeare's Globe Book Award; two co-edited collections of Shakespeare criticism; and a volume of poems, Laws of Rest, with another forthcoming. He has published articles on the Scottish context of The Merchant of Venice, food in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, Titus Andronicus and American cannibalism, Martha Stewart and domestic labour, and Robert Duncan as a translator of Rilke. His poetry and translations have appeared in journals and anthologies across North America. A former restaurant critic and journalist, his food writing has appeared in SAVEUR, The New York Sun, and numerous other publications. In the 2011-12 year, he coordinated the Creative Writing Program. Before joining the faculty at York, he was an assistant professor of English at the University of Tulsa.

Area of Specialization

English

Degrees

Ph.D. in English, Stanford University
M.A. in Writing, The Johns Hopkins University
B.A. in English, Yale University

Current Research Projects

With Whom We Eat: Literature and Commensality

Summary: 
In his essay “On Experience,” the sixteenth-century philosopher Michel de Montaigne asserts, “We should not so much consider what we eat as with whom we eat.” My next monograph, With Whom We Eat: Literature and Commensality, explores the concept of commensality—the relationships produced by acts of eating, the “with whom” of food—in imaginative literature from the ancient, early modern, and contemporary periods. The project seeks to define commensality as fundamental to a cultural understanding of food, to explore the centrality of the concept in literary texts, and to demonstrate the importance of literary criticism to the burgeoning discipline of food studies—a discipline in which the study of imaginative writing is often marginalized. The project views literary history from the perspective of food in order to divine what we can learn from them in the context of our own relationships to eating.


Project Type: Funded

Lost Originals

Summary: 
A book of poems, to be published in fall 2016 by BookThug.

All Publications

Books

Culinary Shakespeare (edited collection). Amy Tigner, co-editor. Duquesne University Press, 2016.

Shakespeare and Hospitality (edited collection). Julia Reinhard Lupton, co-editor. Routledge, 2016.

Lost Originals. Toronto: BookThug, 2016.

Object Permanence (poetry chapbook). Ugly Duckling Presse: 2015.

Laws of Rest (poetry book). BookThug: 2013.

Eating and Ethics in Shakespeare's England (scholarly monograph). Cambridge University Press: 2013.

Been Raw Diction (poetry chapbook). Dusie Press, 2006.

Book Chapters

“Facing King Lear.” In Shakespeare and the Power of the Face. Ed. James Knapp. Burlington, VT: Ashgate Press, 2015, pp 75-91.

“Woolley’s Mouse: Early Modern Recipe Books and the Uses of Nature.” In Ecofeminist Approaches to Early Modernity. Ed. Jennifer Munroe and Rebecca Laroche. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 105-128.

“Recipes for Living: Martha Stewart and the New American Subject.” Ordinary Lifestyles: Popular Media, Consumption and Taste Cultures. Ed. David Bell and Joanne Hollows. London: Open University Press, 2005.

Journal Articles

“The Price of Pork: Jews, Scots, and Pigs in The Merchant of Venice.” SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 54.2, Spring 2014, pp. 315-348.

“Emmanuel Levinas and the Ontology of Eating.” Gastronomica, Summer 2010, pp. 34-44.

“The Cook and the Cannibal: Titus Andronicus and the New World.” Shakespeare Studies 37, Fall 2009, pp. 99-133.

“Shakespeare and Food: A Review Essay.” Literature Compass 6:1, January 2009, pp. 153-174.

“The Lure of the God: Robert Duncan on Translating Rilke.” John Felstiner, co-author. Jacket magazine 31: October 2006.


Teaching:

Approach To Teaching
Methods of learning have changed greatly since the Elizabethan schoolmaster John Ascham wrote that “the scholehouse should be counted a sanctuary against feare,” but the essence of his statement remains fresh. In every class I teach, my goal is to spark the enthusiasm of my students both for the subject at hand and for the learning process. I view my classroom as a space for experimentation without fear of recrimination. I encourage students to explore unfamiliar ideas to the greatest possible extent, while developing a clear understanding of the space’s boundaries. By creating a supportive, exciting environment for the pursuit of knowledge, I hope to imbue in my students a general love of learning and to help instill in them the curiosity and inspiration to continue the journey.


Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/EN3620 6.0  Intermediate Poetry Workshop SEMR  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/EN4002 6.0  Food and Writing SEMR