Janice I Newton

Department of Political Science
School of Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies

Associate Professor
National 3M Teaching Fellow, 2005
Interim Master, Vanier College

Office: Vanier College, 254
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 77380
Emailjnewton@yorku.ca

My current research focuses on two projects. One is the history of representation in the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA). It explores the last 100 years of the CPSA,interrogating patterns of inclusion and exclusion in the development of the Association. My other research project is focused on the question: How can we educate students for democracy? What democratic skills are needed in the contemporary context, and what pedagogical practices would foster the development of these skills? This second research question also frames my approach to teaching.

Degrees

Professional Leadership

Currently 2016-2017 Interim Chair, Vanier College; 2014-16 College Academic Life Coordinator, Vanier College; 2009-14 Chair, LAPS Teaching and Learning Committee; 2011-12 Teaching Awards Committee, Canadian Political Science Ass'n (CPSA); 2010-11 Co-chair, Education Committee, International Listening Association;

Research Interests

Canadian Studies , Democracy and Education, History of Canadian Political Science

All Publications

Books

Chief Editor, editorial committee. Voices from the Classroom: Reflections on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. Garamond and York University Bookstore, 2001.

The Feminist Challenge to the Early Canadian Left, 1900-1918. McGill Queen's University Press, 1995. 366 pages.

Book Chapters

“The Plight of the Working Girl,” in Labouring Canada. Eds. Bryan Palmer and Joan Sangster. Don Mills, ON: Oxford University Press, 2008.

“Plagiarism and the Challenge of Essay Writing: Learning from our Students,” Voices from the Classroom, 2001.

“Improving Student Learning through Feedback: Classroom Assessment Techniques,” Voices from the Classroom, 2001.

Journal Articles

"Democracy across the disciplines: Design your course for democracy," Collected Essays on Teaching and Learning (CELT) Vol. II, Alan Wright and Margaret Wilson, 2009.

Approach To Teaching

Student Feedback on POLS 4903, Canadian Democracy Capstone: "I just wanted to thank you for all the information you provided in the Canadian Democracy Capstone (POLS 4903) about active listening procedures. The importance of active listening skills often goes under the radar at most institutions. However, upon incorporating them into my resume I secured a position within the Ministry of Health. When I applied for the job, I had originally applied for a data entry position. When I went for the interview I was asked what I meant by “active listening”, upon explanation, I was offered a position in Customer Relations and then promoted to Investigations. These positions not only paid significantly more then the data entry position, but the reason I got these positions, I suspect, is because they require active listening skills to successfully address the issues. The people I dealt with on a day-to-day basis were very ill and often were not looking for very much more than someone to listen to and deal with their concerns. I cannot stress the importance of what you have taught me, it is a vital skill."

Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/POLS2910 6.0  Canadian Democracy in a North American Context LECT  


My current research focuses on two projects. One is the history of representation in the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA). It explores the last 100 years of the CPSA,interrogating patterns of inclusion and exclusion in the development of the Association. My other research project is focused on the question: How can we educate students for democracy? What democratic skills are needed in the contemporary context, and what pedagogical practices would foster the development of these skills? This second research question also frames my approach to teaching.

Degrees

Professional Leadership

Currently 2016-2017 Interim Chair, Vanier College; 2014-16 College Academic Life Coordinator, Vanier College; 2009-14 Chair, LAPS Teaching and Learning Committee; 2011-12 Teaching Awards Committee, Canadian Political Science Ass'n (CPSA); 2010-11 Co-chair, Education Committee, International Listening Association;

Research Interests:

Canadian Studies , Democracy and Education, History of Canadian Political Science

All Publications

Books

Chief Editor, editorial committee. Voices from the Classroom: Reflections on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. Garamond and York University Bookstore, 2001.

The Feminist Challenge to the Early Canadian Left, 1900-1918. McGill Queen's University Press, 1995. 366 pages.

Book Chapters

“The Plight of the Working Girl,” in Labouring Canada. Eds. Bryan Palmer and Joan Sangster. Don Mills, ON: Oxford University Press, 2008.

“Plagiarism and the Challenge of Essay Writing: Learning from our Students,” Voices from the Classroom, 2001.

“Improving Student Learning through Feedback: Classroom Assessment Techniques,” Voices from the Classroom, 2001.

Journal Articles

"Democracy across the disciplines: Design your course for democracy," Collected Essays on Teaching and Learning (CELT) Vol. II, Alan Wright and Margaret Wilson, 2009.


Teaching:

Approach To Teaching
Student Feedback on POLS 4903, Canadian Democracy Capstone: "I just wanted to thank you for all the information you provided in the Canadian Democracy Capstone (POLS 4903) about active listening procedures. The importance of active listening skills often goes under the radar at most institutions. However, upon incorporating them into my resume I secured a position within the Ministry of Health. When I applied for the job, I had originally applied for a data entry position. When I went for the interview I was asked what I meant by “active listening”, upon explanation, I was offered a position in Customer Relations and then promoted to Investigations. These positions not only paid significantly more then the data entry position, but the reason I got these positions, I suspect, is because they require active listening skills to successfully address the issues. The people I dealt with on a day-to-day basis were very ill and often were not looking for very much more than someone to listen to and deal with their concerns. I cannot stress the importance of what you have taught me, it is a vital skill."


Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/POLS2910 6.0  Canadian Democracy in a North American Context LECT