Matthew C Clark

Department of Humanities

Associate Professor

Office: Vanier College, 251
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext: 77396
Emailmatthewc@yorku.ca

Professor Matthew Clark specializes in Classical Philology, and most of his publications concern Homeric Epic. His current projects are: an upper-level textbook titled Exploring Greek Myth and a study of the representation of the self in narrative, titled The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. His next project will be a study of the ancient travel writer Pausanias and his use of Greek myth.

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Professor Matthew Clark specializes in Classical Philology, and most of his publications concern Homeric Epic. He also has an interest in the Ancient Novel; Rhetoric; and Literary Theory. He is interested in literary traditions, both oral and written, and in the way artists use these traditions in the formation of their own works. He is also interested in mimesis, that is, language as representation. All of these interests require close attention to the history of literature and the history of language. His current projects are: (1) an upper-level textbook titled Exploring Greek Myth, which will be published by Blackwell in 2011; this is designed to fill the gap between introductory textbooks and scholarly work in the field, to provide students with a way to move beyond the stories of myth towards the theoretical work which is the current concern of scholars in the field. (2) A study of the representation of the self in narrative, titled The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self, which will be published by Ohio State University Press in 2010. His next project will be a study of the ancient travel writer Pausanias and his use of Greek myth.

Degrees

PhD, Harvard University
MA, University of Toronto
BA, University of Toronto


Research Interests

Classic Philology: Homeric Epics, Ancient Greek Novels, and Rhetoric;
Literary Theory and Theory of Narrative
Literary Language as Representation

Selected Publications

The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. Ohio State University Press, 2010.

'Hektor and Poulydamas.' College Literature 34.2 (Spring 2007): 85-106.

'Formulas, Metre, and Type-Scenes.' The Cambridge Companion to Homer. Ed. Robert Fowler. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

A Matter of Style: Writing and Technique. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Out of Line: Homeric Composition Beyond the Hexameter. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1997.

Selected Publications

The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. Ohio State University Press, 2010.

'Hektor and Poulydamas.' College Literature 34.2 (Spring 2007): 85-106.

'Formulas, Metre, and Type-Scenes.' The Cambridge Companion to Homer. Ed. Robert Fowler. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

A Matter of Style: Writing and Technique. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Out of Line: Homeric Composition Beyond the Hexameter. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1997.

All Publications

Books

The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. Ohio State University Press, 2010.

A Matter of Style: Writing and Technique. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Out of Line: Homeric Composition Beyond the Hexameter. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1997.

Book Chapters

'Formulas, Metre, and Type-Scenes.' The Cambridge Companion to Homer. Ed. Robert Fowler. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

'Enjambment and Binding in Homeric Hexameter.' The Oral Traditional Background of Ancient Greek Literature. Ed. Gregory Nagy. London: Routledge, 2002.

Journal Articles

'Hektor and Poulydamas.' College Literature 34.2 (Spring 2007): 85-106.

Forthcoming

Exploring Greek Myth. Blackwell, 2011. Forthcoming.

Current Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/GK2000 6.0  Intermediate Classical and Biblical Greek LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/HUMA4107 6.0  The Ancient Greek and Roman Novel SEMR  


Professor Matthew Clark specializes in Classical Philology, and most of his publications concern Homeric Epic. His current projects are: an upper-level textbook titled Exploring Greek Myth and a study of the representation of the self in narrative, titled The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. His next project will be a study of the ancient travel writer Pausanias and his use of Greek myth.


Professor Matthew Clark specializes in Classical Philology, and most of his publications concern Homeric Epic. He also has an interest in the Ancient Novel; Rhetoric; and Literary Theory. He is interested in literary traditions, both oral and written, and in the way artists use these traditions in the formation of their own works. He is also interested in mimesis, that is, language as representation. All of these interests require close attention to the history of literature and the history of language. His current projects are: (1) an upper-level textbook titled Exploring Greek Myth, which will be published by Blackwell in 2011; this is designed to fill the gap between introductory textbooks and scholarly work in the field, to provide students with a way to move beyond the stories of myth towards the theoretical work which is the current concern of scholars in the field. (2) A study of the representation of the self in narrative, titled The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self, which will be published by Ohio State University Press in 2010. His next project will be a study of the ancient travel writer Pausanias and his use of Greek myth.

Degrees

PhD, Harvard University
MA, University of Toronto
BA, University of Toronto

Research Interests:

Classic Philology: Homeric Epics, Ancient Greek Novels, and Rhetoric;
Literary Theory and Theory of Narrative
Literary Language as Representation

All Publications

Books

The Structures of Narrative and the Language of the Self. Ohio State University Press, 2010.

A Matter of Style: Writing and Technique. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Out of Line: Homeric Composition Beyond the Hexameter. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1997.

Book Chapters

'Formulas, Metre, and Type-Scenes.' The Cambridge Companion to Homer. Ed. Robert Fowler. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

'Enjambment and Binding in Homeric Hexameter.' The Oral Traditional Background of Ancient Greek Literature. Ed. Gregory Nagy. London: Routledge, 2002.

Journal Articles

'Hektor and Poulydamas.' College Literature 34.2 (Spring 2007): 85-106.

Forthcoming

Exploring Greek Myth. Blackwell, 2011. Forthcoming.


Teaching:

Current Courses

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TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/GK2000 6.0  Intermediate Classical and Biblical Greek LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/HUMA4107 6.0  The Ancient Greek and Roman Novel SEMR