Matthew Brzozowski

Department of Economics

Associate Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1086
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext: 20152
Emailbrzozows@yorku.ca

I am an Associate Professor of Economics at York University. My areas of research combine labour economics and household (consumer) economics. I am interested in household behaviour, financial security, and standards of living. I am concerned with ways through which households prepare for and manage anticipated and unanticipated changes in labour earnings. I am especially interested in economics of aging population and issues relevant to economic well-being upon retirement. I have earned my PhD degree from McMaster University in 2005.

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Degrees

PhD, McMaster University


Research Interests

Economics , Policy , Public Finance, Demographic economics

Selected Publications

Matthew Brzozowski: Welfare Reforms and Consumption among Single Mother Households: Evidence from Canadian Provinces, 33(2), June 2007, pp. 227-250.

Matthew Brzozowski: Does One Size Fit All? The CPI and Canadian Seniors, 32(4), December 2006, pp. 387-412.

All Publications

Journal Articles

Matthew Brzozowski: Welfare Reforms and Consumption among Single Mother Households: Evidence from Canadian Provinces, 33(2), June 2007, pp. 227-250.

Matthew Brzozowski: Does One Size Fit All? The CPI and Canadian Seniors, 32(4), December 2006, pp. 387-412.

Other

Food Expenditure and Involuntary Retirement: Resolving the RetirementConsumption Puzzle
(with Garry Barret)
American Journal of Agricultural Economics , 2012, 94(4), pp.945-955
Abstract: International research has shown that household expenditure on nondurables significantly decreases at retirement - a finding that is inconsistent with the standard life-cycle model of consumption if retirement is anticipated. We analyze Australian panel data and find that the decline in grocery and food expenditure is explained by households forced to retire earlier than planned due to a health event or job-loss, which represent unanticipated wealth shocks. For most households retirement is anticipated and there is no decline in basic expenditures. However, for an important minority, retirement is ‘involuntary’ and these households experience a marked decline across the basic expenditure categories.
[go to paper]

Measuring Living Standards with Income or Consumption: A Canadian Perspective
(with Thomas F. Crossley)
Canadian Journal of Economics , 2011, 44(1), pp.88-105
Abstract: Knowledge spillovers through worker mobility between firms, found in previous research, imply that knowledge production within firms creates a positive externality to the hiring firms and their workers. We calculate the shares in the gains from spillovers retained by these parties using matched employer-employee data from Danish manufacturing. We find that around two-thirds of the total output gain (0.1% per year) is netted by the firms as extra profit, about a quarter goes to the incumbent workers as extra wages, while the workers who bring spillovers receive no more than 8% of it. This gains distribution, which favors the hiring firms, is similar for different types of moving workers, and is stable over time.
[go to paper]

Using Engel Curves to Estimate the Bias in the Australian CPI
(with Garry Barrett)
Economic Record , 2010, 86(272), pp.1-14
Abstract: To measure real income growth over time, a price index is needed to adjust for changes in the cost of living. The consumer price index (CPI) is often used for this task; but several country studies show that it is a biased measure of such changes, leading to potentially inaccurate estimates of the rate of real income growth. This paper calculates CPI bias for urban Indonesia by estimating food Engel curves for households with the same level of CPI-deflated incomes at four different points in time between 1993 and 2008. The results suggest that CPI bias was negative during the 1997--98 crisis but has been positive since 2000. From 1993 to 2008, CPI bias averaged 4% annually, equivalent to almost one-third of the measured inflation rate.
[go to paper]

Consumption, Income, and Wealth Inequality in Canada
(with Martin Gervais, Paul Klein and Michio Suzuki)
Review of Economic Dynamics , 2010, 13, pp.52-75
Abstract: In this paper, we document some features of the distribution of income, consumption and wealth in Canada using survey data from many different sources. We find that wage and income inequality have increased substantially over the last 30 years, but that much of this rise was offset by the tax and transfer system. As a result, the rise in consumption inequality has been relatively mild. We also document that wealth inequality has remained fairly stable since 1999. Using both confidential data and publicly available data, we are able to gauge the extent to which the publicly available data conceals aspects of inequality that confidential data reveals.
[go to paper]

Home Cooking, Food Consumption and Food Production among Retired Canadian Households
(with Yuqian Lu)
Canadian Public Policy , 2010, 36(1), pp.107-128
Abstract: Utilizing the 1996 Canadian Food Expenditure Survey matched with the Canadian Nutrient File, we attempt to differentiate between food consumption and the observed food expenditure among retired Canadians. We look at the effect of retirement on food expenditure, production, and consumption to test the universality of results obtained by Aguiar and Hurst (2005) from US data. In contrast to US results, conditional on a similar vector of covariates, we find no evidence of a fall in food expenditure following retirement. Our results suggest that the quality of food consumed by Canadian households improves somewhat with retirement. Similar to US results, we observe that household calorie intake and major nutrient intake seem not to be adversely affected by changes in retirement status. We find evidence that retired households substitute food purchased for consumption away from home for food purchased for at-home consumption. Further, using the 1998 Time Use Survey, we find that individuals who are retired devote more time for food preparation.
[go to paper]


I am an Associate Professor of Economics at York University. My areas of research combine labour economics and household (consumer) economics. I am interested in household behaviour, financial security, and standards of living. I am concerned with ways through which households prepare for and manage anticipated and unanticipated changes in labour earnings. I am especially interested in economics of aging population and issues relevant to economic well-being upon retirement. I have earned my PhD degree from McMaster University in 2005.

Degrees

PhD, McMaster University

Research Interests:

Economics , Policy , Public Finance, Demographic economics

All Publications

Journal Articles

Matthew Brzozowski: Welfare Reforms and Consumption among Single Mother Households: Evidence from Canadian Provinces, 33(2), June 2007, pp. 227-250.

Matthew Brzozowski: Does One Size Fit All? The CPI and Canadian Seniors, 32(4), December 2006, pp. 387-412.

Other

Food Expenditure and Involuntary Retirement: Resolving the RetirementConsumption Puzzle
(with Garry Barret)
American Journal of Agricultural Economics , 2012, 94(4), pp.945-955
Abstract: International research has shown that household expenditure on nondurables significantly decreases at retirement - a finding that is inconsistent with the standard life-cycle model of consumption if retirement is anticipated. We analyze Australian panel data and find that the decline in grocery and food expenditure is explained by households forced to retire earlier than planned due to a health event or job-loss, which represent unanticipated wealth shocks. For most households retirement is anticipated and there is no decline in basic expenditures. However, for an important minority, retirement is ‘involuntary’ and these households experience a marked decline across the basic expenditure categories.
[go to paper]

Measuring Living Standards with Income or Consumption: A Canadian Perspective
(with Thomas F. Crossley)
Canadian Journal of Economics , 2011, 44(1), pp.88-105
Abstract: Knowledge spillovers through worker mobility between firms, found in previous research, imply that knowledge production within firms creates a positive externality to the hiring firms and their workers. We calculate the shares in the gains from spillovers retained by these parties using matched employer-employee data from Danish manufacturing. We find that around two-thirds of the total output gain (0.1% per year) is netted by the firms as extra profit, about a quarter goes to the incumbent workers as extra wages, while the workers who bring spillovers receive no more than 8% of it. This gains distribution, which favors the hiring firms, is similar for different types of moving workers, and is stable over time.
[go to paper]

Using Engel Curves to Estimate the Bias in the Australian CPI
(with Garry Barrett)
Economic Record , 2010, 86(272), pp.1-14
Abstract: To measure real income growth over time, a price index is needed to adjust for changes in the cost of living. The consumer price index (CPI) is often used for this task; but several country studies show that it is a biased measure of such changes, leading to potentially inaccurate estimates of the rate of real income growth. This paper calculates CPI bias for urban Indonesia by estimating food Engel curves for households with the same level of CPI-deflated incomes at four different points in time between 1993 and 2008. The results suggest that CPI bias was negative during the 1997--98 crisis but has been positive since 2000. From 1993 to 2008, CPI bias averaged 4% annually, equivalent to almost one-third of the measured inflation rate.
[go to paper]

Consumption, Income, and Wealth Inequality in Canada
(with Martin Gervais, Paul Klein and Michio Suzuki)
Review of Economic Dynamics , 2010, 13, pp.52-75
Abstract: In this paper, we document some features of the distribution of income, consumption and wealth in Canada using survey data from many different sources. We find that wage and income inequality have increased substantially over the last 30 years, but that much of this rise was offset by the tax and transfer system. As a result, the rise in consumption inequality has been relatively mild. We also document that wealth inequality has remained fairly stable since 1999. Using both confidential data and publicly available data, we are able to gauge the extent to which the publicly available data conceals aspects of inequality that confidential data reveals.
[go to paper]

Home Cooking, Food Consumption and Food Production among Retired Canadian Households
(with Yuqian Lu)
Canadian Public Policy , 2010, 36(1), pp.107-128
Abstract: Utilizing the 1996 Canadian Food Expenditure Survey matched with the Canadian Nutrient File, we attempt to differentiate between food consumption and the observed food expenditure among retired Canadians. We look at the effect of retirement on food expenditure, production, and consumption to test the universality of results obtained by Aguiar and Hurst (2005) from US data. In contrast to US results, conditional on a similar vector of covariates, we find no evidence of a fall in food expenditure following retirement. Our results suggest that the quality of food consumed by Canadian households improves somewhat with retirement. Similar to US results, we observe that household calorie intake and major nutrient intake seem not to be adversely affected by changes in retirement status. We find evidence that retired households substitute food purchased for consumption away from home for food purchased for at-home consumption. Further, using the 1998 Time Use Survey, we find that individuals who are retired devote more time for food preparation.
[go to paper]