Margaret E. Schotte

Department of History

Assistant Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 2138
Phone: 4167362100 Ext: 30418
Emailmschotte@yorku.ca
Primary websitewww.margaretschotte.com
Secondary websiteyorku.academia.edu/MargaretSchotte

I am an assistant professor of Early Modern History in York's Department of History. My research and teaching interests include the Renaissance and Reformation, History of the Book and Reading, and the History of Science and Technology.

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My current book project, Sailing Schools: Navigating Science and Skill, 1550-1800, is a comparative study of nautical knowledge. How did early modern sailors develop mathematical and technical expertise in the age of exploration and the print revolution? By analyzing rare manuscripts produced by sailors themselves, this study explores the many different ways by which mariners mastered scientific concepts--on shore, in the classroom, and on board ship--and how these practices in turn shaped their societies.

Degrees

PhD, MA, Princeton University
MA, University of Toronto
BA, Harvard University


Research Interests

History , Science and Technology , Early Modern Science, Book History, Maritime History

All Publications

Journal Articles

“Expert Records: Nautical Logbooks from Columbus to Cook,” Information & Culture: A Journal of History 48 no. 3 (2013), 281-322.

“Regimented Lessons: The Evolution of the Nautical Logbook in France,” Annuaire de Droit Maritime et Océanique (June 2013), 91-115.

“‘Books for the Use of the Learned and Studious’: William London’s Catalogue of Most Vendible Books,” Book History, vol. 11 (2008), 33-57.

Book Reviews

Review of Smith, Helen and Louise Wilson, eds. Renaissance Paratexts (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011) Renaissance and Reformation / Renaissance et Reforme 38.2 (Spring 2015): 240-242.

Other

Ph.D. Dissertation: “A Calculated Course: Creating Transoceanic Navigators, 1580-1800” Princeton University, 2014.

Current Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall 2017 AP/HIST2250 3.0  Revolutions in the Stars: Science in the Age of Galileo LECT  
Fall 2017 AP/HIST3234 3.0  Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/HIST4230 6.0  Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle SEMR  


I am an assistant professor of Early Modern History in York's Department of History. My research and teaching interests include the Renaissance and Reformation, History of the Book and Reading, and the History of Science and Technology.


My current book project, Sailing Schools: Navigating Science and Skill, 1550-1800, is a comparative study of nautical knowledge. How did early modern sailors develop mathematical and technical expertise in the age of exploration and the print revolution? By analyzing rare manuscripts produced by sailors themselves, this study explores the many different ways by which mariners mastered scientific concepts--on shore, in the classroom, and on board ship--and how these practices in turn shaped their societies.

Degrees

PhD, MA, Princeton University
MA, University of Toronto
BA, Harvard University

Research Interests:

History , Science and Technology , Early Modern Science, Book History, Maritime History

All Publications

Journal Articles

“Expert Records: Nautical Logbooks from Columbus to Cook,” Information & Culture: A Journal of History 48 no. 3 (2013), 281-322.

“Regimented Lessons: The Evolution of the Nautical Logbook in France,” Annuaire de Droit Maritime et Océanique (June 2013), 91-115.

“‘Books for the Use of the Learned and Studious’: William London’s Catalogue of Most Vendible Books,” Book History, vol. 11 (2008), 33-57.

Book Reviews

Review of Smith, Helen and Louise Wilson, eds. Renaissance Paratexts (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011) Renaissance and Reformation / Renaissance et Reforme 38.2 (Spring 2015): 240-242.

Other

Ph.D. Dissertation: “A Calculated Course: Creating Transoceanic Navigators, 1580-1800” Princeton University, 2014.


Teaching:

Current Courses

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TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall 2017 AP/HIST2250 3.0  Revolutions in the Stars: Science in the Age of Galileo LECT  
Fall 2017 AP/HIST3234 3.0  Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/HIST4230 6.0  Technologies of Communication: A History of Reading from the Codex to the Kindle SEMR