Wendy McGuire

School of Social Work

Assistant Professor

Office: Ross Building, S833
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 20567
Emailwmcguire@yorku.ca

Wendy McGuire teaches critical social theory, critical social work practice and research methods using innovative arts-based and experiential methods and exploring these pedagogical interventions through her research. Current research projects include Student Perceptions of Arts-based Assignments, the LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project, and What Difference Does God Make in LGBT+ Human Rights Movements? Wendy is committed to building linkages between university and community, recently launching a four-part Community Conversations series in a collaboration between the School of Social Work, LA&PS, and a network of community agencies based in the Black Creek Community.

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Area of Specialization

Community-Based Research Methods, Forced Migration of LGBT+ People, Social Movements, Arts-Based Education and Activism

Degrees

PhD, University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
MSW, University of Toronto, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work
BA, Sociology, University of Guelph

Community Contributions

Black Creek Community Collaborative, Jane-Finch Community Research Partnership, Peace and Justice Strategy Team (Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto)

Research Interests

Social Work , Sociology , Art and Activism, LGBT+ Social Movements, Critical Pedagogy

Current Research Projects

Cultivating a Critical Social Work Habitus: Understanding the Role of Emotion in Translating Critical Social Work Knowledge into Practice

Summary: 
This study explores the use of two tools to help undergraduate social work students identify, express and respond to emotion in relation to critical theory. It is hypothesized that students who become more adept at recognizing and expressing emotion will develop a critical social work habitus that enables them to translate theoretical knowledge into practice across a wide range of situations.


Project Type: Self-Funded
Role: Principal Investigator


Start Date:  Month: Sep  Year: 2014
End Date:  Month: Jul  Year: 2016

What Difference Does God Make to LGBT+ Human Rights Movements?

Summary: 
This Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CB/PAR) project is a long-term study the role of God, religion and spirituality in social movements both for and against LGBT+ human rights. It explores the social justice strategies and priorities of social movement actors within the partnering organization, Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto, and with other local and global LGBT+ social movement actors.


Project Type: Self-Funded
Role: Principal Investigator

Collaborator Institution: Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto
Collaborator Role: Research partner

LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project

Summary: 
Seven male refugees from West Africa participated in this project. Over two weekends, they worked with Community Story Strategies to create a 3-4 minute digital story about the experiences that led them to Canada. All men came from countries where their LGBT status put them at high risk of prison, torture and possibly death. Digital storytelling was used a research methodology that put control in the hands of the participants to tell their stories in their own way and for their own use.

Description: 
The LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project is a small part of a larger Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CB/PAR) study, "What Difference Does God Make to LGBT+ Human Rights Movements?" The partnering organization is the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto, the only organization in Canada that is a Sponsorship Agreement Holder, and can support the sponsorship of LGBT+ refugees.

Project Type: Funded
Role: Principal Investigator


Start Date:  Month: Nov  Year: 2015
End Date:  Month: Nov  Year: 2016

Collaborator: Reverend Kevin Downer
Collaborator Institution: Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto
Collaborator Role: Research partner

All Publications

Books

McGuire, W. (2011.) Constructing Quality in Academic Science: How Basic Scientists Respond to Canadian Market-Oriented Science Policy- A Bourdieusian Approach. University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. NR78305.

Journal Articles

McGuire, W. (2016) . Cross-Field effects of science policy on the biosciences:  Using Bourdieu's relational methodology to understand change. Minerva: A Review of Science, Learning and Policy, 54(3):325-351.

Albert, M and McGuire, W. (2014) . Understanding Change in Academic Knowledge Production in a Neoliberal Era. Political Power and Social Theory; Fields of Knowledge: Science, Politics and Publics in the Neoliberal Age; vol 27; Edited by Scott Frickel, David Hess - Chapter 2. http://people.bu.edu/juliango/ppst/welcome.html

Albert, M., Laberge, S. and McGuire, W. (2012) . Criteria for assessing quality in academic research: the views of biomedical scientists, clinical scientists and social scientists. Higher Education, March 2012. http://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10734-012-9519-2

Lemieux-Charles L, McGuire WL. (2006) . What do we know about health care team effectiveness? A review of the literature. Med Care Res Rev. 63(3):263-300.

McGuire WL. (2005) . Beyond EBM: new directions for evidence-based public health. Perspect Biol Med. 48(4):557-69.

Forthcoming

McGuire, W and Zhang, H. Cultivating a Critical Social Work Habitus Through Emotional Reflexivity, in preparation for the Canadian Social Work Review

McGuire, W. and Short, M. Using CB/PAR to Challenge Homonormativity in an LGBT+ Faith Community, in preparation for Critical Social Work

McGuire, W. Putting Anti-Oppressive Theory into Practice in the Social Work Classroom Using Arts-Based Assignments, in preparation for Social Work Education

McGuire, W. What do trauma narratives do? Lessons from an LGBT Refugee Digital Storytelling Project, in preparation for Action Research

Approach To Teaching

My teaching is based on four principles: relationality, reciprocity, multi-modality and experientiality. 1) Relationality. Relationships matter. Academic knowledge is more likely to be used in policy and practice when it is transmitted through relationships over time. Students also learn best through positive relationships with each another and their professors. 2) Reciprocity. Learning is a two-way street. I learn as much as I teach from my students and how to meet them where they are at. I am challenged with new ways of thinking, knowing, being and doing. 3) Multi-modality. To maximize student success, I use a wide variety of modes of teaching and evaluating. Students may learn kinesthetically, orally, visually, or through traditional reading and writing. 4) Experientiality. Students are impacted when they put knowledge into practice, experientially, using art, community-based research, and through activism.

Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK2050 6.0  Identity, Diversity and Anti-Discriminatory Practice LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK2050 6.0  Identity, Diversity and Anti-Discriminatory Practice LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK4000 6.0  Practicum in Social Work I  PRAC  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK4000 6.0  Practicum in Social Work I  PRAC  


Wendy McGuire teaches critical social theory, critical social work practice and research methods using innovative arts-based and experiential methods and exploring these pedagogical interventions through her research. Current research projects include Student Perceptions of Arts-based Assignments, the LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project, and What Difference Does God Make in LGBT+ Human Rights Movements? Wendy is committed to building linkages between university and community, recently launching a four-part Community Conversations series in a collaboration between the School of Social Work, LA&PS, and a network of community agencies based in the Black Creek Community.

Area of Specialization

Community-Based Research Methods, Forced Migration of LGBT+ People, Social Movements, Arts-Based Education and Activism

Degrees

PhD, University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
MSW, University of Toronto, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work
BA, Sociology, University of Guelph

Community Contributions

Black Creek Community Collaborative, Jane-Finch Community Research Partnership, Peace and Justice Strategy Team (Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto)

Research Interests:

Social Work , Sociology , Art and Activism, LGBT+ Social Movements, Critical Pedagogy

Current Research Projects

Cultivating a Critical Social Work Habitus: Understanding the Role of Emotion in Translating Critical Social Work Knowledge into Practice

Summary: 
This study explores the use of two tools to help undergraduate social work students identify, express and respond to emotion in relation to critical theory. It is hypothesized that students who become more adept at recognizing and expressing emotion will develop a critical social work habitus that enables them to translate theoretical knowledge into practice across a wide range of situations.


Project Type: Self-Funded
Role: Principal Investigator


Start Date:  Month: Sep  Year: 2014
End Date:  Month: Jul  Year: 2016

What Difference Does God Make to LGBT+ Human Rights Movements?

Summary: 
This Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CB/PAR) project is a long-term study the role of God, religion and spirituality in social movements both for and against LGBT+ human rights. It explores the social justice strategies and priorities of social movement actors within the partnering organization, Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto, and with other local and global LGBT+ social movement actors.


Project Type: Self-Funded
Role: Principal Investigator

Collaborator Institution: Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto
Collaborator Role: Research partner

LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project

Summary: 
Seven male refugees from West Africa participated in this project. Over two weekends, they worked with Community Story Strategies to create a 3-4 minute digital story about the experiences that led them to Canada. All men came from countries where their LGBT status put them at high risk of prison, torture and possibly death. Digital storytelling was used a research methodology that put control in the hands of the participants to tell their stories in their own way and for their own use.

Description: 
The LGBT+ Refugee Digital Storytelling Project is a small part of a larger Community-Based Participatory Action Research (CB/PAR) study, "What Difference Does God Make to LGBT+ Human Rights Movements?" The partnering organization is the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto, the only organization in Canada that is a Sponsorship Agreement Holder, and can support the sponsorship of LGBT+ refugees.

Project Type: Funded
Role: Principal Investigator


Start Date:  Month: Nov  Year: 2015
End Date:  Month: Nov  Year: 2016

Collaborator: Reverend Kevin Downer
Collaborator Institution: Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto
Collaborator Role: Research partner

All Publications

Books

McGuire, W. (2011.) Constructing Quality in Academic Science: How Basic Scientists Respond to Canadian Market-Oriented Science Policy- A Bourdieusian Approach. University of Toronto (Canada), ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. NR78305.

Journal Articles

McGuire, W. (2016) . Cross-Field effects of science policy on the biosciences:  Using Bourdieu's relational methodology to understand change. Minerva: A Review of Science, Learning and Policy, 54(3):325-351.

Albert, M and McGuire, W. (2014) . Understanding Change in Academic Knowledge Production in a Neoliberal Era. Political Power and Social Theory; Fields of Knowledge: Science, Politics and Publics in the Neoliberal Age; vol 27; Edited by Scott Frickel, David Hess - Chapter 2. http://people.bu.edu/juliango/ppst/welcome.html

Albert, M., Laberge, S. and McGuire, W. (2012) . Criteria for assessing quality in academic research: the views of biomedical scientists, clinical scientists and social scientists. Higher Education, March 2012. http://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10734-012-9519-2

Lemieux-Charles L, McGuire WL. (2006) . What do we know about health care team effectiveness? A review of the literature. Med Care Res Rev. 63(3):263-300.

McGuire WL. (2005) . Beyond EBM: new directions for evidence-based public health. Perspect Biol Med. 48(4):557-69.

Forthcoming

McGuire, W and Zhang, H. Cultivating a Critical Social Work Habitus Through Emotional Reflexivity, in preparation for the Canadian Social Work Review

McGuire, W. and Short, M. Using CB/PAR to Challenge Homonormativity in an LGBT+ Faith Community, in preparation for Critical Social Work

McGuire, W. Putting Anti-Oppressive Theory into Practice in the Social Work Classroom Using Arts-Based Assignments, in preparation for Social Work Education

McGuire, W. What do trauma narratives do? Lessons from an LGBT Refugee Digital Storytelling Project, in preparation for Action Research


Teaching:

Approach To Teaching
My teaching is based on four principles: relationality, reciprocity, multi-modality and experientiality. 1) Relationality. Relationships matter. Academic knowledge is more likely to be used in policy and practice when it is transmitted through relationships over time. Students also learn best through positive relationships with each another and their professors. 2) Reciprocity. Learning is a two-way street. I learn as much as I teach from my students and how to meet them where they are at. I am challenged with new ways of thinking, knowing, being and doing. 3) Multi-modality. To maximize student success, I use a wide variety of modes of teaching and evaluating. Students may learn kinesthetically, orally, visually, or through traditional reading and writing. 4) Experientiality. Students are impacted when they put knowledge into practice, experientially, using art, community-based research, and through activism.


Upcoming Courses

TermCourse NumberSectionTitleType 
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK2050 6.0  Identity, Diversity and Anti-Discriminatory Practice LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK2050 6.0  Identity, Diversity and Anti-Discriminatory Practice LECT  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK4000 6.0  Practicum in Social Work I  PRAC  
Fall/Winter 2017-2018 AP/SOWK4000 6.0  Practicum in Social Work I  PRAC